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How did Joseph Smith manage to avoid creating a name phonoprint, yet J.R.R. Tolkien couldn’t?

Using 183 names from Tolkien’s writings and 130 from the Book of Mormon, Brad Wilcox, Wendy Baker-Smemoe, Bruce L. Brown and Sharon Black conducted some exploratory analysis of the sound prints found in both sets of writings.

They summarize their findings:

[D]o authors use specific sounds more than others — consciously or subconsciously — when selecting or inventing names? Some research suggests they may and that their patterns could create a “sound print” or phonoprint. This constitutes a fresh and unusual path of research that deserves more attention. The purpose of this exploratory study was to see if phonoprints surfaced when examining Dwarf, Elf, Hobbit, Man, and other names created by Tolkien and Jaredite, Nephite, Mulekite, and Lamanite names found in the Book of Mormon. Results suggest that Tolkien had a phonoprint he was unable to entirely escape when creating character names, even when he claimed he based them on distinct languages. In contrast, in Book of Mormon names, a single author’s phonoprint did not emerge. Names varied by group in the way one would expect authentic names from different cultures to vary. 

Comparing Book of Mormon Names with Those Found in J.R.R. Tolkien’s Works: An Exploratory Study – Brad Wilcox, Wendy Baker-Smemoe, Bruce L. Brown and Sharon Black

The authors also explain how:

Even when [Mark] Twain intentionally tried to create words (names) to represent different worlds, he was unable to change his own free-flow noncontextual word patterns successfully enough to simulate wordprints representing other peoples or cultures.

Comparing Book of Mormon Names with Those Found in J.R.R. Tolkien’s Works: An Exploratory Study – Brad Wilcox, Wendy Baker-Smemoe, Bruce L. Brown and Sharon Black

If Tolkien and Twain couldn’t avoid creating a phonoprint, how did Joseph Smith manage to? 

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